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The U.S. stock market remains open Friday, Nov. 11, for Veterans Day, even through it counts as a holiday for the $53 trillion American bond market.

That means a full day of trade for stocks, which appear poised to book a robust week of gains, despite continued fears of a potential U.S. economic recession as the Federal Reserve works to tame stubbornly high costs of living.

Signs of a potential cooling off on the inflation front led the Dow Jones Industrial Average
DJIA,
+3.70%

to advance 1,200 points on Thursday, with it, the S&P 500 index
SPX,
+5.54%

and Nasdaq Composite Index
COMP,
+7.35%

all booking their best daily gains since 2020.

While Friday marks the start of a three-day weekend for the bond market, Treasury yields already have climbed dramatically this year with the Fed’s sharp rate hikes. The central bank aims to temper demand for goods and services by making borrowing costs more restrictive.

Consumers may feel certain effects of inflation in their everyday lives, like when they go to the grocery store. But it can also impact our savings and investments. Here’s what to know.

The benchmark 10-year Treasury rate
TMUBMUSD10Y,
3.819%

fell to about 3.8% on Thursday, but was up from a 1.3% low last December. Bond yields move in the opposite direction of prices.

The fresh rally on Wall Street followed the consumer-price index reading for October showing a 7.7% annual rate, down from a 9.1% high in June. The Dow remains down more than 8% from its January peak, the S&P 500 is 17.5% lower and the Nasdaq is 31% below its last record close, according to Dow Jones Market Data.

Veterans Day was born out of the wreckage of World War I, with Nov. 11 recognized as a legal holiday in the U.S. in 1938, two decades after an armistice between the Allied nations and Germany went into effect at the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month.

See: Veterans Day: Are banks open? Does USPS deliver mail?


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